Latin Dance Is A Passion
Back to Latin Dance Home Page

Back to Tango Lessons Learned Page 1


This page is up to date as of .
Please check below often for new and revised "Lessons Learned."

Part 2 - Mastering Argentine Tango
More Advanced Lessons Learned
and
Tango Philosophy Developed Along The Way

More About The Dance
The Tango

As I begin this page 2 of "Lessons Learned" I have been studying and dancing tango for 5 months. I am still taking group classes with Alex Krebs at Beretin, Bill Alsup at The Viscount Studios SW, and Robert Hauk/Maija Wells at the Viscount Studios SW.

SUDDENLY I SEE SOME TANGO DANCERS DIFFERENTLY

Near Total Immersion To Learn Tango - Blessing or Curse

I don't know when it happened but I started to realize that my tango dancing skill level has passed many dancers who have been dancing much longer than me. Some have been dancing tango years longer than me. Almost as though I am seeing from different eyes I look at many of the men dancing who I previously held in awe and their dancing now seems pretty basic. Much to my surprise much of their dancing seems to be without any inspired musicality. Many also lack style, fluidity of movement and assertiveness. I DO NOT take pleasure in this observation.

One of the women that I have enjoyed dancing with who has been dancing for a few years didn't even know what musicality was and had never heard of it before. I now find that many of the women that I dance with are unfamiliar with many of the intermediate and advanced turns and patterns. I can now tell that many women who I have been dancing with from the start of my learning tango have problems with the cross, the back ocho, the forward ocho, and other basics. It is also much more obvious to me when I am dancing with a woman who is not responding to my movement/lead and failing to move her leg back quickly enough or far enough. ...leading her backward motion with her body instead of her leg. Then there are a few who have no clue what I am leading when I lead an ocho cotada ...or leading a step over ...or gancho ...so they jump around and do whatever comes to mind.

The problem is that many people took two or three tango lessons and have not advanced beyond that. Others have had intermediate and even some advance lessons but either skipped or have forgotten the basics of the cross, forward ocho, etc. Since I enjoy dancing with these women I have the choice of sharing with them what I have learned or just keep my dancing to the basic level that they know.

I have become a little gun shy about talking about improving our dance while dancing after one woman got her a_s on their shoulders but I am happy to say that most of my dance partners are thrilled to learn new stuff and to chat about improving our dancing together and improving our connection. Once we work it out the dance experience is enhanced for us both. Above all I am really happy to see a lot of my dance friends starting to take more classes. It's going to be so much more exciting at dances to have more women that I am able to dance patterns like ganchos, planeos, secadas, boleos and others, etc. etc. etc.

THE DANCE FLOOR IS NO PLACE FOR RUDENESS

Leave ugliness and personal problems at home or at your job
Bring your manners and gentility

I was in a class and heard a woman dancer talking about how she would stop dancing and storm off the dance floor if she didn't like the fact that her dance partner was trying to tell her something about her dancing or attempting to teach her something. Well ...even if he is right or wrong, misguided, just guilty or poor timing or not asking permission POLITENESS should ALWAYS BE THE RULE! Do not be rude on the dance floor or at the dance. Be polite. Say nothing. Say "Thank you". Say "let's talk about it later". But be polite and try to finish the dance. You don't have to accept another dance with that person if you are that annoyed. Most women do not have problems like this. Do a little self examination if you cannot openly discuss something about a dancing pattern. Personally I crave feedback that will help me dance better with each and every dance partner.

I also heard an instructor telling a class that it is okay to stop dancing and walk off the dance floor. My first response is that there is barely any woman over the age of 14 who needs a man to tell them how to handle men. It is a survival skill women start to learn from the day they are born. ...and women don't need encouragement in the direction of intolerance and rudeness. My second response is what I said above. Handle all situations opting for manners, politeness, gentility, good social communication ...and try to enjoy and finish the dance or the series of dances...and say "Thank you for the help ...or the info."

HOWEVER if you are not that good of a dancer yet (and even if you think you are!), you might benefit from at least listening and trying to figure out if there is anything of value being said. It is to your benefit to be able to dance well with all levels and styles of dancing. If you close your mind to the idea that you could improve or connect better with certain dancers you may become small minded, limited and mediocre. The best dancers in the world are constantly learning from each other and "EVERYONE" they dance with. They not only learn new patterns, new movements, new interpretations of music's rhythm and beats from the better dancers but they strengthen their sensitivity, communication and connection skills when dancing with those of lesser skills. The whole of dance is a communication ...and how you react whether the social communication is verbal or a dance step or pattern measures your social skills as well as your dance skills. Those who have spoiled or rotten personalities in life will be spoiled and rotten on the dance floor no matter how good their skill.

I STILL HAVE A LOT TO LEARN - EVEN THE BASICS

I have taken over 10 beginning tango classes from nearly all the local instructors. Some of them are repeated classes with the same instructor. I have had several people ask me why I take beginning classes at this stage of my dancing. I tell them that you are never to good to take a beginning class. The better you are at the fundamentals the better dance you will be. Just recently in Alex's class we were practicing the going from the basic walk to the quick time "corrida (little run)." I had done this dozens of times while dancing. Alex came over to me and showed me that I was bending over and losing my body integration just before starting the quick time forward.

In class Robert and Maija also caught me bending over forward somewhat while dancing in close embrace with a tango friend, Julia. I am sure it occurs when I am dancing with a woman who I want to cuddle with but I will have to resist the urge to do that. It is important to keep my posture straight up and not lose my "body integration".

Claiming your space
It may sound like a small thing but it is important to "claim your space" while dancing. This is done by the lead extending his left hand that holds follower's hand sufficiently to his left. The elbows must still be down. Maija made me awary that I was neglecting to do claim my space. You don't want a ballroom look but you do want to avoid letting other dancers on a crowded dance floor occupy the space you will need to manuever.

So ...there's always something that you can improve on and occasional relapses do happen.

FUN, EXCITEMENT AND SOPHISTICATION
OF GANCHOS,BOLEOS, SECADAS AND PLANEOS

The addition of these sophisticated movements to your dance patterns adds beauty, excitement and fun.

Alex's class on ganchos, boleos and secadas adds a new dimension to my dancing. I am happy that a lot of my favorite dance partners are taking the class too because these moves require familiarity and the skill of both the lead and the follow. They cannot "properly" be executed if the follow does not know what the lead is doing.

ABOUT THE GANCHO
The most likely mistake that the lead will make in leading the gancho is failing to step/place his foot the follower's foot. He must also not put weight on that lead foot and should bend his knee to position himself closer to the follower.

The follower should execute the front gancho according to the timing and movement of the lead. It is lead all the way through. The mistake that followers will usually make is doing the front gancho all the way through to completion without waiting for the timing of the lead at each phase of the movement. The wrap of the leads leg is done when lead initiates it with a turn/opening of his shoulders. The release of the wrap/gancho is also led. So the follower should wait and be sensitive to the timing of the wrap/gancho and the release of the gancho/wrap. If the lead is close to the follower and bends his knee slightly with no weight on his lead foot it makes it easier for the follower to correctly wrap the upper part of the lead's thigh.

The back gancho should be done with quickness and energy when kicking the leg up and back down to the floor. There is no pause. It is done in continuous motion up then down. Alex says that the follow's back kick/back gancho should be aimed as though she is aiming for the lead's back pocket ...and that her foot comes up behind as though she is looking to see if there is something on her shoe sole. So the back kick/back gancho is between the leads legs aimed up towards the lead's pocket and with the foot coming up as thought the follow is trying to see what's on the shoe sole.

ABOUT THE SECADA
Whereas the gancho can only be properly done from the open embrace, the secada can be done from either open or closed embrase. In closed embrase thigh to thigh contact can be added to make the movement more connected. If it is done in open embrace the contact is foot to foot. Alex said that the secada lead from a close embrace may be a little confusing for the follower because it may be harder to distinguish it from a gancho lead. So in the close embrace if in doubt she can lift her leg over the lead's leg and avoid the decision.

ABOUT THE BOLEO
In Alex's class I finally got to learn the boleo. On the previous page of "Lessons Learned" I talked about "Taking Advanced Tango Classes Before You Are Ready." I mentioned the workshop that I took with Felip and Kat. The workshop was "Strictly Advanced: Fooling Around With The Axis." Having the skill to do the boleo was key to getting the most from the workshop. I will be ready next time.

I have never noticed such a variety of class responses to a new pattern before. One very experienced lead was very frustrated after the class and said that he never got past the first two steps to the side which starts the boleo.

One of the followers that I was practing with seemed to being doing it correctly but she was convinced that something she was doing was wrong until Alex tried it with her and said it was okay. One of the leads asked how to avoid being kicked by the followers foot during the boleo.

Prior to teaching the class Alex told us that it was a difficult pattern to learn. During the class he said we were the best boleo class that he had ever had.

Personally I found the counter movement of the "ghost pivot" simultaneous with the lead stepping behind the follower with his outside foot was intricate but easy.

I enjoyed the movement and did not find it difficult. There is a tendency to forget to pivot the follower in the opposite direction to which I am stepping.

The follower's kick should aim for the leads outer pants pocket or his pants leg seam and then the foot whips a line back down to the floor.

ABOUT THE PLANEO
For the follower it is important to remember to help support the lead while he is doing the planeo (help hold him steady). Once the lead intiates the thrust of the planeo the follower has the responsiblity of keeping the momentum of her rotation going all the way to completion of the movement around the leads' axis. While doing the planeo the lead is on one foot and off balance. He is trying to keep up his own momentum. He can not carry the follower if she is dragging behind or not stabilizing the movement.

A WORD ABOUT YOUR SPACE
The front gancho, the planeo and the secadas allow the dancers to stay within their space. The back gancho with the back kick goes out side of the dancer's space. You must be sure that you have enough space around you to do it safely without kicking someone.

PERFECTING THE TANGO WALK

BE MORE GROUNDED

I Can't Believe I Still Had Work To Do On My Tango Walk

Steven Payne teaches not getting ahead of the beat of tango. He uses the analogy of a slow hot lazy day where you just barely want to move. It is this almost lazy lag in your step that he uses to define being grounded. Your aim and impulse is to be slight behind the music. This in effect puts you on the correct beat and keeps you from getting ahead of the music.

Bill Alsup also worked with me to get me more grounded. He contrasted the more formal elegant steps of ballroom dancing with the more down to earth steps of tango. He says that no one has ever accused him of being elegant. Little did he know that my movement is transitioning out of Latin dancing not ballroom. Nevertheless I needed a stronger connection to the ground.

Finally in an advanced intermediate tango waltz class Robert and Maija pointed out that I needed to hit more on my heals as I walked. You cannot imagine the stress of finding out that after all this time my walk was still not right. I told Robert that I feel like I'm learning to walk all over again. He said that I WAS learning to walk again. I said that I am talking about learning to "tango" walk all over again. He said, "You are!". "It's the next level." As we practiced in the class it felt very different to change my tango walk. It felt very awkward to be concentrating on getting my heals down first and with more emphasis. After quite a bit of practice I finally got it and then was able to switch my focus to the rhythm, movements and patterns for the tango/waltz.

TO LEAD OR NOT TO LEAD THE CROSS

TO CROSS AUTOMATICALLY, TO CROSS WHEN LED OR NOT CROSS AT ALL

I have been taught both ways of going into the cross. Some instructors will say it is always led not only by stepping outside of the follows' right side but by twisting the upper body to the right and then straightening the upper body back to the left. Some instructors say that it is "Code" that the follow always crosses if the lead steps outside to her right side and continues a couple more steps forward on her right outside. Yet some will say that although it is automatic for the follow to cross if the lead continues his steps on the follow's right outside he does lead the cross with a small twist of the upper body to his right and a slight straightening to his left.

I have been leading the cross for quite some time however in a recent beginning class taught by Alex I was twisting my upper body to the right to stay parallel with the follow. Alex pointed out that I was giving too much rotation to the right and then straightening to the left. As such it was causing the follow to swing her cross over step wide to her right which was a turn instead of the intended cross.

Going back to beginning classes and drilling with brand new beginning dancers will point out sloppy technique quickly as it did in this case because these beginners will not be able to compensate for errors in your technique. It is however excruciatingly painful to repeat beginning classes with students who can barely put one foot in front of the other in a coordinated way. It is amazing that some new dancers are a pleasure to dance with from day one of their tango lessons yet others make you want to escape the class because of their uncontrolled neurotic movements and constant state of confusion. Nevertheless with patience and an observant instructor you will improve and learn something about your own dancing every time.

In short the cross is an area of controversy that causes confusion. I dance with some follows who require no lead to cross other than my walking outside her right side. Some will not cross no matter how many steps I take on their outside right. Others get the lead if I simply twist my upper body to my right to parallel theirs and straighten to my left. There are however many who need a much stronger lead to know when to cross. The worst problem occurs when followers start a cross immediately after the lead steps to her outside ...much too early. Everytime a lead steps outside the follower does not lead to a cross. I often will immediately step back inside to prevent the follow's left foot from coming across to cross and then continue my walk straight ahead.

Since this IS the reality of dancing with different partners. I opt for leading the cross. Generally by the time I have danced a minute or two with any follow I can tell if she requires a stronger lead or not. ...and if it didn't work the first time then I have to adjust the lead when I try it again.

MUSICALITY, RHYTHM, IMAGERY, INNOVATION AND IMPROVISATION

Two of these the terms that I will describe, imagery and improvisation", may be used for the first time in connection with tango. You will not likely hear other instructors teaching you about these techniques. I believe that these concepts have a place in developing tango skills and I will explain what I mean by them below. I have found them exceptionally helpful in other dances that I teach and they have helped me to accelerate my tango skills thus far and to make my dancing more fun and enjoyable for my dance partners.

MUSICALITY AND RHYTHM

What Is Musicality?

What Is Rhythm?

How To Add Musicality To Your Dance?

Although I have practice musicality in Steven and Maija's classes and took Alex's "Musicality" class, musicality and rhythm is an area of tango that I fortunately already understood. Not only do I understand it but it is bursting out of me to the point that I have to control it to some degree. I teach a new style of Latin dancing which I created called "Nuevo Expresión" My musicality and rhythm is a direct carry over from this style of Latin dancing that I dance and also teach.

In Alex's 2 week musicality class he asked everyone for a short description of what they thought musicality was. There were many different answers but Alex said that for the purpose of the class "rhythm" was the correct answer ...and that we would get into some related concepts later.

I knew the answer he wanted was "rhythm" but decided to say "imagery" instead. I am always thinking beyond the question and since this was not an S.A.T. test I felt safe to stretch the definition because the question was too easy for me.

So what is meant by "rhythm"?

I was talking to an older man in one of the Latin dance classes that I teach and trying to get him to step in time with the rhythm of the music. He was a major challenge!!!! He admitted to me that he never quite knew what was meant by rhythm. I have heard people erroneously say that they don't have any "rhyth" but never heard someone say that they didn't understand what it was. After I got over the shock I put the music back on and had him listen and then move to the separate elements and separate instruments in the music. I pointed out the underlying drumbeat and base instruments set the tempo or basic timing of the music. I had him clap his hands and stomp his feet to this underlying pulse/beat. He began to get it although he needed more practice and muscle control to improve his timing of clapping his hands and stepping to the beat exactly on beat.

This under-beat often marked by percussion sounds/instruments or it is frequently the heavier downbeat or bass notes and phrases. This underlying beat is the glue that sets and maintains the pace and timing, holds the music together and keeps it grounded.

Now contrast that to the sounds that flow and float from the upper level instruments. Listen to the horns and the string instruments. Listen here for the overall melody of the music. You hear the lyrical phrases that make the music familiar. ...or as Alex says, This is the part that you would whistle to." This part of the music may soar off into the stratosphere and the cloud and then come back to earth. It may disappear, reappear, be thin, fat, flighty, happy, sad, moody, mystical, bizarre, spiritual, airy, fast or slow.

When you can hear all these separate sections of the music and how they combine and play off each other you can hear the rhythm (pulse, beat, cadence, tempo) of the music and the lyrical phrasing. You then can step, move or pause to series of beats and contiguous phases that you hear according to the music's feeling, melody, pace and pauses.

What do I mean by "Imagery"? ...and what does it have to do with "Musicality" and "Innovation"?

When I start to answer this question a lot of images come into my mind. The first is an image of grace and beauty of a man and woman dancing tango. It is a very attractive picture. They are dressed for the tango, have a great connection and I can "SEE" poise and attitude in their faces and posture.

Then, there is the music.

When I was a child in the early grades our class was introduced to classical music. I still remember being told to let my mind be free, to close my eyes and to think of what "images" the music brings to my mind. When I hear music I am able to get visual images. I may hear/see ocean waves, birds, flowers, a marching band, a battle, a bullfighter, a tap dancer, a ballroom waltz, a threatening storm, a beautiful tango move, a diabolical fiend, evil, angels, a foot race, thunder, scenes from an old movie, a body posture, an attitude, etc. The images are fleeting. I do not dwell on them in as much as the music is constantly shifting, developing and projecting more and more.

Allowing for imagery in your musical expressiveness gives "meaning and emphasis" to the rhythm of the music. Even without an understanding of rhythm is possible that strong "imagery" alone could produce inspired rhythmic dancing. It "is" of course advisable to become well grounded in "rhythm" first in order to dance well. "Imagery" takes rythm to the next level. It leads you to dynamic changes, stronger feeling, new shapes, more power and different messages. Overall it gives "color, substance and meaning" to your dance instead of aimless, meaningless uninspired dance patterns.

Remember you heard it here first.
As my skill and patterns improve, my dancing will express more and more of this concept.

Unlike other dances like salsa, swing and ballroom dances that have a basic pattern that you follow, in tango you have no specific pattern to follow. You are dancing out your feelings, telling a story, interpreting the music, ...so having internal yet dynamic imagery will inspire your dancing.

INNOVATION AND IMPROVISATION

What Is Innovation and Improvisation?

This is another area of dance that is just bursting free from within me due to "Nuevo Expresión".

Innovation is defined as originality, novelty and improvement. You hear this associated with new ideas, new types of thinking or thought, new forms of design or art, etc.

Improvisation is defined as ad-libbing, inventive and creative. You hear this associated with jazz session and acting most often.

So how does that apply to dancing tango or dancing in general?
First of all it is a change from the same old way of doing something. It is taking a movement or dance pattern and adding, subtracting or modifying it in a way that makes it different. ...a fresh new movement or pattern. The results may be aesthetically pleasing, good or bad but it is still "innovation."

In one of his classes Robert told us that the pattern that he had just taught us started as a mistake. After he realized that it worked even though it was not what he intended he realized that he had created a new move for himself and continued to use it in his dancing.

Being innovative by bringing "improvisation" into a discussion of tango.

Most explanations of tango do not consider "improvisation" in their discussion or writing. I believe, however, that it is as important as "innovation". It is similar but not the same as "innovation". If you came up with a new pattern or movement while dancing with little or no prior planning it is IMPROVISATION." This is much harder to do because to be true improvisation the variation to the steps, movement, pattern or series must be created instantaneously or spontaneously while dancing. For a musician it is "playing by ear". For a dancer it is "dancing by ear". In jazz it is a community experience between all the musicians. In tango it is a spontaneous conversation between you and your tango partner. It is the high point of the creative genius at work within you. It does not come from conscious thinking. As in jazz "improv" where the new musical phrasing just flows out, in dance a myriad of new movements and steps combinations will just happen if you let it.

With all the hundreds of thousands of people who have danced tango in over 100 years it is unlikely that you have invented a new wheel. Somebody somewhere may also have discovered this dance movement or pattern. Nevertheless it is innovative dancing if you did it on your own.

Back To Innovation

The most basic definition of innovative dancing is when you are stringing together many different dance patterns after dance patterns and movements after movements that your have learned ...that relate closely to the rhythm of the music and you are not having to pre-think about which movement you are going to do next.

How To Add Innovation To Your Dance

This first begins to happen when the music rhythm and the dance enters your subconscious. ...and most of the dance patterns and movements that you learned move from your conscious thinking to you body and muscle reflexes. The mixture of the music rhythms that you hear and the dynamic feedback from your body as you move along with visual cues of where your body, feet and dance partner are at any given beat-moment will overwhelmingly initiate your next movement.

If this has not happened to you yet. You need to saturate yourself with the music until it is coming out of your ears. You also need to take more classes and hammer in dozens of movements and patterns to the point where you have dreams about them. Then practice practice practice. I promise you when you then get on the dance floor with your dance partner your innovative dancing will just "take off".

THEY WERE STILL TALKING ABOUT ALCIA PON'S HARD STOP

Leading pauses for creativity of the woman

MORE FUN AND FEAR

Alex's class on opening and closing the embrace and the exchange of lead and follow

A SILENT PLACE

I find that I naturally use a lot of pauses and alternate timing in my tango dancing. Selectively placing pauses or silent places in your dance patterns can add interest, beauty and increased expression to your dancing. When the lead pauses it is an opportunity -if not an invitation - for the follower to "talk" (add her own embellishments) with her unweighted foot. It is acceptible as long as it does not impede or distract the lead and the continuity of the dance, or the lead's timing. The options are a lot of embellishment, a little subtle embellishment or to mirror the lead's pause. We discussed this in one of Robert and Maija's classes. My observation was that excessive embellishment can seem to be "too much" aesthetically. My preference most of the time is for the follower to assist me in "capturing the moment" and to assist me in "painting the still".

Update on "How am I doing"

Almost 5 months into my tango dancing I danced with several women who came in from the coast for a night of tango dancing at the Viscount Ballroom. They had varying skill levels from beginner to Intermediate. They seemed to enjoy dancing with me and were chatting together about my dancing. A couple of them told me that I should be teaching tango. Of course that made me feel very good because it validated my dancing. For me it is "how good the experience is that I am giving/sharing with my dance partner" that is my ultimate validation. What those others think is secondary since I am not trying to perform for the crowd. At the same time I still feel inadequate because I know how much more I have to learn. I also know the areas where I need to be more consistent in my dancing. ...but I am getting there. What do I mean by "getting there". Getting where? I mean I want to be as good as the top Argentine Tango dancers in the US and Argentina. I like to set my goals high. Maybe too high?????

You too should set high goals in tango.

Click below for my tango poems:
The 4th Man Tango - The Last Tanguero-
The Mystery Melody of Tango
La Femme Fatale - Tango At The Café de Sal
Dance of Love


© Copyright 2003 Global Media 1 (888) 604-0222


Back to Tango Lessons Learned Page 1

Click Here to Tango Terms and Definitions

Click here for more about Argentine Tango History and Music.

Click Here to go to How To Learn Tango and Argentine Tango Etiquette.

Go to Latin Dance classes and lessons
in Portland, Oregon and Vancouver, Washington.

Call for Schedule: Instructor: Alberto 1 (888) 604-0222
alsheppard@1stgmc.net

    Here is what you can gain from the class:

  • Introduction and Appreciation of Tango History, Music, Movement and Form
  • Learn a total of 8 Latin dances with Rhythm, Timing and Latin Motion--Not Just Steps & Turns
  • Fun
  • Liberation
  • Healing
  • Ecstasy
  • Personality Enhancement
  • Escape
  • True Moments of Clarity
  • A Near Religious Experience
  • Improved Health and Cardio Vascular Strength
  • Happiness
  • A Spiritual Experience
  • Communication That Transcends Language
  • People See A New Attractiveness
  • Relaxation
  • Stress Relief
  • Relationship Enhancement
  • Marriage Strengthening
  • Self Fulfillment
  • A Romantic Poetic Art Form
  • An Enduring Style of Dance
  • and...You will become one of the best all around dancers in the U.S.!
Alberto
1 (888) 604-0222

alsheppard@1stgmc.net
salsa@dance-classes.com:

Alberto
1 (888) 604-0222

Alberto Teaches Members of The RiverPlace Athletic Club
The Exclusive Marina at the RiverPlace Athletic Club
The Exclusive Marina at the RiverPlace Athletic Club
Alberto Teaches Members of The RiverPlace Athletic Club


CLICK BELOW - GO TO DANCE CLASSES
6 and 10 Weeks at BABALU

Alberto Teaches on Thursdays 8:00 p.m. at Babalu in Vancouver, WA

BABALU LATIN DANCE NIGHT CLUB and CARIBBEAN RESTAURANT

Alberto Teaches on Thursdays 8:00 p.m. at Babalu in Vancouver, WA

Salsa
Merengue
Cumbia
Cha Cha
Rumba
East Coast Swing
Night Club Two Step
Latin Hip Hop
Argentine Tango Introduction

Click Here for 6 and 10 week dance class lessons schedule and Details For Vancouver, Washington

GO TO DANCE CLASSES
6 and 10 Weeks at BABALU

Click here to read Al's Profile (FOR SINGLE WOMEN ONLY)

New Free Expression Latin Dance Class Home Page

Click Here To See  Dance Poetry by Alberto
Click Here To See Dance Poetry by Alberto


Latin Dance Is A Passion
Click Here To Hear Latin Music


Click Here To See Photo Gallery
Click Photo Gallery Button To See Photo Gallery Going To Dinner- Photo

Click Here to Go to Fernando's New Year's House Party - Photo Page 2
Click Here to Go to New Year's Party at La Rumba- Phote Page 3
Click Here to Go to The original La Rumba Downtown Portland - Phote Page 4
Click Here to Go to Assorted Dance Photos at La Rumba and the Viscount Ballroom - Phote Page 5
Click Here to Go to Al's business office - Photo Page 6




Web Designers, Site Hosting, Internet Access
Designed by Al Sheppard & Company
1stgmc.net

Copyright 2003 Global Media (503) (503) 234 7003













Portland tango dance classes lessons, Vancouver tango, Argentine Tango, Milonga, Salsa, swing, mambo,dancing, dance Latin, classe, classs, instruction, leson, lessons, Portland, Oregon, Vancouver, Washington, Dance classes and lessons Caribbean South American food, restaurants, dinning, entertainmentdance, classes, lessons, learn to dance, swing, latin, salsa, cha cha, merengue, casino rueda, rumba, hip hop, tango, ballroom dance instruction in Vancouver, Washington, Portland, Oregon, nuevo baile de libre expresión latina, Entertainment, Latin American food, dancing, music, bands, restaurant, night club, caterer, salsa, merenge, cumbia, cha cha, rumba, casino rueda, dancing, dance lessons and classes, Latin CD sales and products of Cuba, Puerto Rico, Argentine Tango, dance poetry, poems, international dance competition, latin american culture and caribbean dining, history of latin american dance, Dominican Republic, spanish speaking employees of paises latinoamericanos y espana, agrentina, bolivia, brasil, chile, columbia, costa rica, equador, el salvador, espana, guatemala, honduras, mexico, nicaragua, panama, paraguay, peru, republica dominiacana, uraguay, venezuela, consulado dance parties, festividades hispanas, consulate dance parties and fun for visitor tourists and residentsLa Rumba, New Free Expression/Nuevo Baile De Libre Expresión Latina salsa dancing in portland, oregon, swing dancing in Portland and Vancouver Washington,Oregon La Rumba, Portland, Oregon, Latin American food, dancing, music, bands, restaurant, night club, caterer, salsa, merenge, cumbia, cha cha, rumba, casino rueda, dancing, dance lessons and classes, Latin CD sales and products of Cuba, Puerto Rico, latin american culture and caribbean dining, history of latin american dance, Dominican Republic, spanish speaking employees of paises latino americanos y espana, agrentina, bolivia, brasil, chile, columbia, costa rica, equador, el salvador, espana, guatemala, honduras, mexico, nicaragua, panama, paraguay, peru, republica dominiacana, uraguay, venezuela, consulado dance parties, festividades hispanas, consulate dance parties and fun for visitor tourists and residentsPortland, Oregon, Latin American food, dancing, music, bands, restaurant, night club, caterer, salsa, merenge, cumbia, cha cha, rumba, casino rueda, dancing, dance lessons and classes, Latin CD sales and products of Cuba, Puerto Rico, latin american culture and caribbean dining, history of latin american dance, Dominican Republic, spanish speaking employees of paises latinoamericanos y espana, agrentina, bolivia New Free Expression/Nuevo Baile De Libre Expresión Latina salsa dancing in portland, oregon, swing dancing in Portland and Vancouver Washington,Oregon La Rumba, Portland, Oregon, Latin American food, dancing, music, bands, restaurant, night club, caterer, salsa, merenge, cumbia, cha cha, rumba, casino rueda, dancing, dance lessons and classes, Latin CD sales and products of Cuba, Puerto Rico, latin american culture and caribbean dining, history of latin american dance, Dominican Republic, spanish speaking employees of paises latino americanos y espana, agrentina, bolivia, brasil, chile, columbia, costa rica, equador, el salvador, espana, guatemala, honduras, mexico, nicaragua, panama, paraguay, peru, republica dominiacana, uraguay, venezuela, consulado dance parties, festividades hispanas, consulate dance parties and fun for visitor tourists and residents New Free Expression/Nuevo Baile De Libre Expresión Latina salsa dancing in portland, oregon, swing dancing in Portland and Vancouver Washington,Oregon La Rumba, Portland, Oregon, Latin American food, dancing, music, bands, restaurant, night club, caterer, salsa, merenge, cumbia, cha cha, rumba, casino rueda, Argentine Tango dancing, dance lessons and classes, Latin CD sales and products of Cuba, Puerto Rico, latin american culture and caribbean dining, history of latin american dance, Dominican Republic, spanish speaking employees of paises latino americanos y espana, agrentina, bolivia, brasil, chile, columbia, costa rica, equador, el salvador, espana, guatemala, honduras, mexico, nicaragua, panama, paraguay, peru, republica dominiacana, uraguay, venezuela, consulado dance parties, festividades hispanas, consulate dance parties and fun for visitor tourists and residents